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Wine

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Decanter
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Castilla Y Léon Grapes Guide

In partnership with Castilla y Léon. Do you know the top Castilla y Léon grapes varieties in Spain's largest wine-producin
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Wine Enthusiast Magazine
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Top 100 Spirits Of 2018

Kentucky gin? Tequila aged in Napa Cabernet barrels? This year our Top 100 Spirits list has a few surprises alongside old standards. See what made the cut.
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Wine Enthusiast Magazine
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Poitin, Ireland’s Original Illegal Spirit, Is Making A Comeback

Ireland has long been associated with whiskey and Guinness. But another Irish spirit, poitin, is making a comeback after a ban that lasted over 300 years.
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Chowhound
Friday, 7 Dec 2018 

Gift Guide 2018: DIY Cocktail Gift Baskets

Everyone has that friend, the cocktail obsessive who collects bitters and has not one, but two Hatch bar mixing glasses. You could easily just gift him or her a bottle of really good rye and call it a day. But instead of taking the easy route this holiday, put a little more Martha Stewart into it, and arrange a cocktail gift basket or bag, which is much easier to put together than it sounds. Below, some tipple-themed ideas.
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Decanter
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Best Domaine De Chevalier White Wines

Decanter expert Jane Anson tastes vintages of Domaine de Chevalier white wines from Bordeaux spanning 40 years. Here's he
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Wine Spectator
Friday, 7 Dec 2018 

8 Gifts For Every Kind Of Wine Lover (Wine Spectator)

Searching for the perfect holiday gift for the wine lover in your life? We’ve got ideas for everything from stocking stuffers (you can never have too many corkscrews!) to gifts for gadget geeks and professional-grade wine region maps for the true student of wine. Pulltap’s Corkscrew$7, iwawine.com The classic waiter’s key is a marvel of simple, efficient design, and these double-hinged versions are Wine Spectator tasting department–approved. They’re also simple to tuck into a pocket (or a stocking), come in pretty much every color of the rainbow, can be personalized, and cost a measly 7 bucks—that’s buy-by-the-case value! Courtesy of Artificer Wood Works Artificer Wood Works Wine BoxesStarting at $35, artificerwoodworks.comThere’s a reason that so many of the world’s most sought-after trophy wines come in fancy wood boxes emblazoned with the winery’s logo—it adds an element of luxury that makes the moment you open it feel that much more special. If you’re giving a bottle of wine to a friend or loved one this holiday season, you can add that same level of sophistication with a personalized wood box from Artificer Wood Works. The boxes are made from aspen and Baltic birch, come in a range of sizes and finishes and can be customized in limitless ways. Artificer also plants one tree for every product sold through a partnership with Trees for the Future, a non-profit working to end hunger and poverty among farmers on degraded lands around the world.Of course, you might be reading this at the last minute, in which case you'll want to check out our video for tips on how to personalize a gift bottle with all kinds of fancy gift-wrapping ideas …[videoPlayerTag videoId="5852516410001"] Courtesy of Wine by Your Side Wine by Your Side Ice Bucket$110, enjoywinebyyourside.comThis innovative ice bucket saves valuable space by easily but securely affixing to a table or counter via a steel extension with rubber-sleeved ends that both grip and protect your surfaces. The stainless-steel bucket is double-walled to both prevent sweating and keep ice from prematurely melting. Just add wine! Courtesy of WineGame DIY Blind Tastings with the WineGame AppFree download, winegame.comSpeaking of entertaining, any wine lover with a smartphone will appreciate the WineGame app from chef José Andrés' ThinkFoodGroup, available on iOS and GooglePlay. All your party needs is four bottles of wine and a way to conceal them for the blind-tasting element. (Kraft wrap, perhaps?) Just make sure no one peeks! Here's how it works: The designated host enters the information about the wines into the app to begin a new game. They can then invite others with the app (did we mention it's free?) to join. Each player samples the wines blind, and the app generates questions about the wines' grapes, regions and vintages. Clues and second guesses are welcome, but the attainable points diminish with each incorrect answer. Technically the person with the most points wins, but we all know that no one loses when it comes to wine tasting. Courtesy of Savino Savino Connoisseur Wine Saving Carafe$50, savinowine.comIn a perfect world, we would open and enjoy our wine all in the same day, but there's often some leftover after cooking or having a glass after work. This wine-preserving carafe keeps wine fresher than leaving it in the bottle with the cork, for up to a week. Just pour your leftover wine into the Savino carafe, then insert the provided float that protects the wine from oxygen. When you're ready to have another glass, you can easily pour from the carafe—no need to remove the float. Once you've finished off the wine, just run Savino through the dishwasher and it's ready to save more wine and money! Courtesy of Rabbit Rabbit LED Bottle Stoppers$16, rabbitwine.comWhile wine is naturally one of the highlights of any outdoor party or occasion, now it can literally light up the celebration with these L.E.D. bottle stoppers. This set of 2 batteries-included stoppers is good for 96 hours of festive bottle-topping nightlighting. They make for a great stocking stuffer! Courtesy of De Long De Long Wine Region MapsStarting at $20, delongwine.comFor the wine lover who loves to learn about where their wine came from, these De Long wine region maps are the perfect addition to a home, cellar or office. The maps, which can also be purchased handsomely framed, are available for a dozen wine regions, from California to France to New Zealand and beyond, and include index booklets for more context. Now you can learn as you sip! Courtesy of Zingerman's Zingerman's Oil & Vinegar Odyssey Gift Box$45, zingermans.comOil and vinegar are great staples for any kitchen, but the kitchen of a wine lover would especially benefit from a gift box filled with Spanish red wine vinegar that's been barrel aged for four years. Combine it with the extra-virgin olive oil for a vinaigrette that's something to celebrate any time of year.
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Wine Enthusiast
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Poitin, Ireland's Original Illegal Spirit, Is Making A Comeback

Ireland has long been associated with whiskey and Guinness. But another Irish spirit, poitin, is making a comeback after a ban that lasted over 300 years.
News
Decanter
Sunday, 9 Dec 2018 

Steven Spurrier's Wines Of The Month

Decanter’s long-standing consultant editor hand-picked fine wines for drinking now and for the cellar, based on tastings that he has attended recently. For drinking now and for the cellar... The post Steven Spurrier’s wines of the month appeared first on Decanter.
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Wine Spectator
Friday, 7 Dec 2018 

Malibu Wine Region Wildfire Survivors Brace For Mudslides (Wine Spectator)

First came fire, then rain. As if recent devastating wildfires hadn’t caused enough suffering for the beleaguered Malibu Coast wine region, an unexpected severe storm dumped an estimated 2 inches of rain on Southern California yesterday. Mud and debris flowed down from the fire-scorched Malibu hills onto the Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) during the morning commute, forcing officials to close the road until late afternoon. (The storm also dumped several inches of snow on a stretch of Interstate 5, California’s main north-south thoroughfare, that passes through the Santa Monica Mountains, forcing its closure too).An already massive and complicated cleanup of the hills between Highway 101 and the Malibu coast that was devastated by the Woolsey fire is now even more complicated. Not only are vintners and growers in the appellation dealing with the loss of homes, vineyards and habitat due to fire, but now they’ve got to think about rain, flooding and mudslides as California’s rainy season begins. (Fires increase the risk of mudslides by stripping the hills of vegetation that holds the soil in place.)The Malibu Coast American Viticultural Area (AVA), established in 2014, encompasses some 50 vineyards totaling approximately 200 acres spread out over 44,598 acres. None of the producers have winemaking facilities on site, due to local restrictions. Wines from Malibu grapes are generally produced in facilities in the Central Coast area. They are all small-production wines, sold mostly to high-end local restaurants in L.A. and consumers in the local tasting rooms or wine clubs.The recent Woolsey fire devastated the area and hit many of the vineyards and wineries hard. Although the extent of damages and losses may not be fully known for many months, some vintners have lost everything: homes, vineyards and tasting rooms.Dakota Semler, owner of Semler Malibu Estates and Saddlerock Vineyards, lost his house and vineyards and narrowly managed to save the exotic animals that were a part of Malibu Wine Safaris, his company that runs open-air vehicle “safaris” through his hillside vineyards.Others' homes were spared, but still face damaged vineyards. Howard Leight, owner of Malibu Rocky Oaks Estate Vineyards, said, “Our vineyards and estate were originally planted for erosion and fire control, so I took everything and threw it into the house, which was like a fortress—covered French limestone. The vines actually took the brunt of the hit.” In the days following the fires, locals and celebrities, many of whom had lost their own homes, banded together to form the Malibu Foundation to aid those who needed help the most. Gathering at the home of actor Gerard Butler and partner Morgan Brown, the celebs managed to raise $2 million to aid victims of the fire. Jamie Foxx, Sean Penn, Cindy Crawford, Rande Gerber, Pierce Brosnan, Minnie Driver and Robin Thicke, along with Butler and Brown, were among those on hand. Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth (who lost their home in the fire) donated $500,000 to the cause. The Malibu Foundation’s website continues to accept donations for victims.What’s next for Malibu’s vintners and growers? There will be a need for vine cuttings to replace damaged or destroyed vines. And more immediately, growers will need to prepare for the effects of rain. “There will be a very high potential for debris flow for the next three or four years,” said Chris Stone, assistant deputy director of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works. “But we can identify where they will likely go. That helps us to plan, evacuate and be prepared.”With the rains falling hard today, rebuilding will have to wait for now.
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Wine Enthusiast
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Oregon's Iberian Connection

Northern Oregon excels with Pinot Noir, while the state's southern regions have turned to warm-climate varieties like Tempranillo, Grenache and Albariño.
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Decanter
Monday, 3 Dec 2018 

Wine Investment Scheme Closed After 'frittering Away' Funds

UK-based investment firm Intercontinental Wines Ltd has been wound up in the public interest after ‘frittering away’ investors’ money on personal expenditure, said UK government officials. UK High Court closes down bogus wine investment firm... The post Wine investment scheme closed after ‘frittering away’ funds appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Monday, 3 Dec 2018 

Chateau Montelena: Profile And Top Wines

In 1976, the famous Judgement of Paris Tasting pushed Napa Valley’s Chateau Montelena into the wine world’s consciousness, bestowing lasting fame...Visit Chateau Montelena and feel the history of the 1976 Judgement of Paris in its 40th anniversary year. Including Cabernets spanning 50 years... The post Chateau Montelena: Profile and top wines appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

How To Build The Perfect Cheese Board

You can't forget about the cheese course at Christmas. But how many cheeses should you have, and what types? We speak to the experts about how to build a perfect cheese board...How to get your cheese board right. We get the expert advice... The post How to build the perfect cheese board appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

Mouton Rothschild To Release Limited Edition Versailles Cases

Château Mouton Rothschild has worked with the Palace of Versailles to create 75 limited edition cases containing five vintages of the Bordeaux first growth’s wines, which are to be auctioned by Sotheby’s in aid of restoration projects at the famous ex-royal residence near Paris.How the Versailles Celebration cases will look. To be auctioned by Sotheby's in 2019... The post Mouton Rothschild to release limited edition Versailles cases appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Thursday, 6 Dec 2018 

South Australia Continues To Deliver Best Wine Tourism

Promotional featureSouth Australia’s 18 diverse wine regions continue to punch above their weight in delivering world-class wine tourism experiences. The d'Arenberg Cube - winner of the regional Architecture and Landscape award and an International Best Of Wine Tourism winner. See the winners.... The post South Australia continues to deliver best wine tourism appeared first on Decanter.
"The airplane stays up because it doesn't have the time to fall." - Orville Wright
December 10, 2018   Ancient China -- Since the beginning of time, mankind has looked up at birds (and to a lesser extent bugs) and marveled at their ability to soar across the sky. Humans...
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Wine Enthusiast
Monday, 3 Dec 2018 

Vineyard Races For Wine Lovers

Whether it's 26.2 in the charming Bordeaux countryside or a 5K along Lake Michigan, here are nine races for wine-loving runners.
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Decanter
Monday, 3 Dec 2018 

Jefford On Monday: English Wine - Look East

Andrew Jefford hails the insights of a new climate study for future UK plantings...The vineyards at Simpsons Wine Estate, in Kent. Looking at the insights of a new climate study for future UK plantings... The post Jefford on Monday: English wine – Look east appeared first on Decanter.
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Wine Spectator
Thursday, 29 Nov 2018 

Is Copper Safe For Wine? (Wine Spectator)

It's a top tool of organic grapegrowers. But is copper sulfate truly safe for vineyards? A new push by European leaders to reduce—and eventually eliminate—copper compounds used by organic and biodynamic winegrowers is making the future of organic viticulture uncertain in some wine regions. Vintners say that without effective alternatives to copper, crop loss in damp years will make organic vineyards economically unsustainable, forcing them to turn to synthetic chemicals or bankruptcy. But as the E.U. moves toward a vote on whether or not to reauthorize the use of copper compounds, leading winemakers argue that Europe's current approach to organic farming is too simplistic, and advocate a more nuanced strategy. "Natural is good, synthetic is bad? It's too basic to reason that way," said Charles Philipponnat, CEO of Philipponnat Champagne. "The objective is to make fine wine in a way that doesn't leave a negative impact for our children." Since the 1880s, copper compounds, typically copper sulfate mixed with lime, have been used by grapegrowers to fight fungus and bacteria threats to vines. For organic growers, who cannot use modern fungicide sprays, copper sulfate remains the most effective weapon against downy mildew. While wine grapes were the original target crop, copper compounds are also widely used for organic potato, tomato and apple farming. But risk assessments by public authorities like the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) show that copper compounds pose risks for farm workers, birds, mammals, ground water, soil organisms and earthworms. These risks make copper unpalatable to many vintners."Copper is a heavy metal and it stays in the topsoil. It's not natural; it's not clean," said Philipponnat. While his Champagne house has eliminated herbicides and chemical fertilizers and uses natural vine treatments, he doesn't rule out synthetic remedies. "I don't think it's bad to use synthetic molecules. Some synthetic molecules disappear much more rapidly. Some synthetic treatments are better than copper, but they aren't accepted for organic viticulture."Can organic farming endure with less copper? Nearly 17 percent of Italy's vineyards are certified organic. In France, 10 percent of the country's vineyards are certified organic or in the process of certification. In Italy, Hungary and Slovenia, roughly half of small and medium-size estates are organically farmed. Under current E.U. rules, certified organic growers are allowed to spray about 5 pounds per acre per year. But there is also a so-called smoothing mechanism: Growers can spray more in wet years as long as they don't exceed 27 pounds per acre over a five-year period."In some areas they used [6 pounds per acre] this year," said Lorenza Romanese, policy advisor for the E.U. Confederation of Independent Growers.Those days are numbered. E.U. lawmakers are currently leaning toward a 25 pound per acre limit over a seven-year period (3.5 pound per acre per year average) starting in January 2019. Initially, E.U. lawmakers did not include the "smoothing mechanism," but the French predicted more than half of the organic vineyards would return to conventional farming. Lawmakers acquiesced to a smoothing mechanism. "At least we're not dead," said Romanese. "For all of Europe, with the smoothing mechanism, we can survive." But he says organic farming will shrink. "We lose Champagne and a few regions in the Loire. The Prosecco region and Trentino–Alto Adige, those two won't make it with [3.5 pounds]."In Burgundy, Philippe Drouhin of the Beaune-based merchant house Joseph Drouhin, told Wine Spectator, "I think that will be a hard challenge for all of us, big and small estates."Not all regions will be as impacted. "It depends where you grow the vineyard. If you are in Bordeaux or Alsace, it's different than if you are in Châteauneuf-du-Pape or Provence," said César Perrin, a fifth-generation grower in the Rhône whose family owns Château de Beaucastel and multiple other properties. "The last rainy vintage was 2008. This year we used [2.7 pounds per acre]." While the concerns of organic farmers have not been ignored, E.U. Health Commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis said, "The protection of health and the environment is my main priority."With environmental and economic sustainability on the line, leading Spanish winemaker Miguel Torres told Wine Spectator, it's time to reconsider where we grow wine: "The most important challenge is climate change. Some organic vineyards have a higher carbon footprint than conventional vineyards. If we listen to nature more, ask ourselves, are we in the optimal place to grow wine grapes?"What are the options for a greener future?Some vintners believe they must look beyond copper. "We believe in organic viticulture, but I don't believe it's enough. It's the past. We have to look to the future," said Torres. "You have to listen to nature. If you have a warm, dry climate, then organic viticulture is fantastic. But if you try organic viticulture in places with high amounts of rain or humidity, the only recourse is fighting with copper, and you will pollute your vineyard with copper."At the same time, Drouhin emphasized that vintners know the disease much better than they used to. And more precise weather forecasts—"To the millimeter is essential," said Drouhin—would allow growers to use sprays more effectively."I see a future for using essential oils and certain bacteria for fungicides," said Philipponnat, who said they had also had good results with a nettle-based spray.In the Rhône, Perrin said, "We use an orange peel spray that helps a lot, and we use a 10 percent whey mixture spray that helps fight mildew. We are pleased with the results."Both Perrin and Drouhin have also adopted the biodynamic philosophies. "With biodynamics, we help the vine be more resistant against those pathogens," said Drouhin. The frustration for biodynamic growers is the dearth of scientific research to back up their anecdotal claims. "Scientists say it's not a science," said Drouhin. Scientists have, however, come up with promising innovations, some with ties to organic and biodynamic methods. For instance, in Bordeaux trials are underway using a spray made with Atlantic algae that has been successful in fighting mildew and has had mixed results in fighting botrytis. The product, created by engineer-enologist Laurent de Crasto and Lionel Navarro of the French National Center for Scientific Research, should be commercially available by 2022.Meanwhile, the French National Institute for Agronomic Research, INRA, has been busy creating disease-resistant grape varieties. In October, they announced the sale of 400 cases of wine made from Artaban, one of the four new grape varieties recently approved for production that are more resistant to fungi. But many winegrowers are skeptical. "The ones we've tried, they've changed the taste of the grapes and the final wine," said Torres. "Will consumers accept the taste?"The main lesson seems to be that organic farming cannot only look to past methods if it is to move into the future. "I'm convinced that if we invested [enough] financial means," said Drouhin, "we would find [an alternative] to copper."Stay on top of important wine stories with Wine Spectator's free Breaking News Alerts.
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Wine Spectator
Thursday, 29 Nov 2018 

SND: Appeals Court Backs Wine Retailers In Illinois Shipping Case (Wine Spe...

The ongoing national debate over interstate retailer shipping took another twist yesterday, as a federal appeals court reversed an earlier decision that had allowed Illinois to bar shipments from out-of-state retailers, as reported by Shanken News Daily, a sister publication of Wine Spectator.The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit found that the earlier district court decision in favor of Illinois failed to adequately examine the state’s justifications for the law, which was challenged on Commerce Clause grounds by Indiana chain Cap n’ Cork (Lebamoff Enterprises). But while it overturned the ruling, potentially opening the door to shipments into Illinois from out of state, the appeals court noted that the looming Tennessee v. Byrd case before the Supreme Court could have significant implications for this and other similar cases looking ahead.The Illinois case stems from the state’s refusal to allow out-of-state retailers to ship to its residents, while allowing shipping by retailers with a physical presence in the state. While Cap n’ Cork and several wine consumers assert that the law is discriminatory and unconstitutional under the Commerce Clause, Illinois says “its restrictions fall within its reserved powers under the 21st Amendment,” in the words of the court.The appeals court decision continued, “The district court accepted Illinois’ reasoning and dismissed the case with prejudice. We conclude that it was too quick to do so in the face of material contested issues about the necessity for and justifications behind the Illinois statute.”For more on this case and other legal challenges, read the full story in Shanken News Daily. Stay on top of important wine stories with Wine Spectator's free Breaking News Alerts.
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Wine Enthusiast
Friday, 30 Nov 2018 

Actor Tituss Burgess On His Pinot Noir

Titus Burgess talks about how a music video became the inspiration for his new line of Pinot Noir and his wines that help support the LGBTQ community.
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Decanter
Sunday, 2 Dec 2018 

South American Riesling: Expert's Choice

Plantings and production levels may yet be small, but Riesling has found a home in Chile, Argentina and Uruguay. Patricio Tapia recommends 12 of the best examples… For most wine lovers there’s no natural association between Riesling and South America. For Riesling fans, the go-to places are …Continue reading » The post South American Riesling: Expert’s Choice appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Thursday, 29 Nov 2018 

DWWA Co-Chair: Michael Hill Smith MW

Michael Hill Smith MW is a Co-Chair at the Decanter World Wine Awards (DWWA)Michael Hill-Smith MW Michael Hill Smith MW Michael Hill Smith MW is a Co-Chair at the Decanter World Wine Awards (DWWA). For the 2019 DWWA, Co-Chairs will …Continue reading » The post DWWA Co-Chair: Michael Hill Smith MW appeared first on Decanter.
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Wine Spectator
Monday, 3 Dec 2018 

Can Brazil's Wine Industry Capture An American Audience? (Wine Spectator)

Brazil's wine industry is more than 100 years old, but until recently, very little of its wines have left the country. However, for the past five years, the South American nation's vintners, with government support, have ramped up their export efforts. And their three major targets are the United States, China and the U.K.“The U.S.A. is our No. 1 target export country,” explained Diego Bertolini, director of marketing for Wines of Brasil. “The fact that more than 120 million Americans drink wine, and the market continues to grow, makes the U.S. an ideal export destination.” But Brazil faces several challenges, none more significant than Americans' unfamiliarity with Brazilian wine."Brazil is a country more famous for its colorful culture, rain forests and pristine beaches than the quality of its wine, although this is quickly changing,” said Master Sommelier Ian Cauble, cofounder of a digital wine merchant. “A dedicated wine-producing community, centered mostly in the Serra Gaúcha region, is producing delicious wines in many styles and colors."Brazil's wine industry dates to the 1880s, when a handful of wineries were established by northern Italian immigrants, but has now grown to more than 1,100 wineries. During the past decade, the wine industry has expanded, with revenues increasing from US$213 million in 2007 to more than $640 million in 2017. Production was 33.7 million cases last year, according to Wines of Brasil. Today there are 195,000 acres of vineyards in the country. Close to 90 percent of Brazil's wine production comes from the Serra Gaúcha region of southern Brazil. The lead grapes there are Chardonnay and Pinot Noir for sparkling-wine production. Farther south, near the Uruguay border, Cabernet Franc, Marselan and Merlot are popular varieties. Asti-style sparkling Muscat and sparkling Glera (the grape in Prosecco) are other growing categories.“Our expertise is sparkling wine,” said Bertolini. “We have been making it for decades, and it matches our culture of celebration. We make all styles of sparkling, from high-end méthode traditionnelle aged for years on the lees to semi-sweet sparkling Moscato.”Some industry experts agree. “Sparkling wine is a particularly bright spot on Brazil's diverse and far-flung vineyard landscape,” said Doug Frost, a Master Sommelier and wine consultant. “There are worthy red and white Brazilian wines, but I think that there is value and even novelty in offering Brazilian bubbly.”That focus on sparkling wine is the foundation of Brazil's export strategy. They're hoping to take part in the growth in sparkling wine sales around the world and continued growth in the category in the U.S. market—according to Impact Databank, a sister publication of Wine Spectator, sparkling wine sales grew 3 percent in 2017, compared to 0.3 percent for all wine. And Brazilians believe bubbly sets them apart from the two leading South American wine-producing nations, Chile and Argentina, which are best-known for still reds.Currently only 11 Brazilian wineries export wine to the U.S., primarily to cities on the East Coast, such as New York and Miami. But Brazilian wine remains relatively unknown among American consumers. And the wines are still arriving in small numbers, with only 16,739 cases of Brazilian wine shipped to the U.S. in 2017, according to U.S. Customs reports. So there is still a lot of work that needs to be done.“It's not that we don't want to have wines from Brazil,” said Wine.com founder Mike Osborn. “We simply don't seem to have suppliers or mainstream wholesalers making them available nationally yet.” Stay on top of important wine stories with Wine Spectator's free Breaking News Alerts.
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Decanter
Saturday, 1 Dec 2018 

Panel Tasting: Best Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadenes

The quality came through in consistent scores, found our judges. Andy Howard MW reports on the tasting... There were very few disappointments in this interesting tasting, and the anticipated consistency of Prosecco came through as  95% of …Continue reading » The post Panel tasting: Best Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadenes appeared first on Decanter.
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Decanter
Friday, 30 Nov 2018 

What Are The Latest Trends For Chinese Wine Consumers - Report

This first market report from the ProWine China trade forum held earlier this month looks at the preferred wine flavour profiles for Chinese consumers and how to attract young professionals into buying wine.Chinese wine lovers at the Decanter Shanghai Fine Wine Encounter 2018. From the ProWine China trade forum... The post What are the latest trends for Chinese wine consumers – report appeared first on Decanter.