Looting Native American Artifacts is Growing
Archaeology
Looting Native American Artifacts is Growing

Beyond the Environmental Damage of Drought and Wildfires, Now it's Looting.

While archaeological pillaging is quite common in some parts of the world, the receding waters around the state of CA caused by the draught has triggered new concerns by exposing vulnerable historical artifacts.
California, where archaeological deposits date back 13,000 years, has seen its first archaeological crimes due to the draught exposing previously submerged areas and the impact of wildfires clearing land. One hard hit area is Lake County, north of San Francisco, which was home to several Native American tribes.
Lake County Drought shown by Lake Oroville in The Atlantic
Lake County Drought shown by Lake Oroville in The Atlantic
As reported by The Chronicle, the area is marked as an Archeological Area
As reported by The Chronicle, the area is marked as an Archeological Area
“Taking the artifacts is illegal, in some cases a felony.”
Anderson Marsh is an artifact hotbed
Anderson Marsh is an artifact hotbed
The Chronicle shared large spear and arrow heads from the Lake City Museum
The Chronicle shared large spear and arrow heads from the Lake City Museum
Stolen artifacts in Lake County
Stolen artifacts in Lake County
Upper Lake Pomo 1923 By Edward S. Curtis
Upper Lake Pomo 1923 By Edward S. Curtis