I'm not looking up values for all of these. Nope.
Stamps
I'm not looking up values for all of these. Nope.

Can You Use And Equate The Cost Of Stamps At a Store As Legal Tender?

I heard somewhere that stamps are legal tender and you can use them as such (maybe on a show or in a movie; I don't remember). But I was curious to know if it was true.
So I googled it and apparently it is true. This was good news to me, because I had an inheritance of sorts, which consisted of plastic containers and books packed with old stamps. I mean, I had no idea what to do with these things. I'm not a collector and have intention of becoming a stamp collector.
I thought about displaying them on a wall as art but it just didn't look good - more like a hodgepodge collection of art scraps. So here's the deal: Stamps are not legal tender.
You can ASK if the store will take them, but they're not legally required to take them. Sterling is the only legal tender in the US but even that has restrictions, as I understand.
So I was feeling stuck. I decided to count the stamps in one single box and multiply that number by 42 cents and then multiply that by the number of boxes I had (6). The books were easier because they were displayed. The total was...$500. The problem was, not all stamps had a 42 cent value.
Some were 1 cent and some were 25 cents, etc. But many had no value listed on them and I figured some might be worth more than 42 cents. So I sold them to a collector for $500 flat.
Book o' stamps
Book o' stamps
Nope.
Nope.
“TL;DR: Stamps are NOT legal tender in the United States. ”
Too much work
Too much work
Don't want to display these
Don't want to display these
Sign-up for Your Enthusiast News, Marketplace, Discussion, Posts, TV & More