Migratory birds
Birdwatching
Migratory birds

I have a secret bird watching hobby and I love migratory birds!

Migration

Migration

There is something so fascinating about watching those winged-creatures out in nature. They are so much fun to watch and spy on. I like to create little backstories with my kiddos when we spy new birds. Since it's migratory season again, I thought I'd teach my kids about some of those birds.
A Barn Swallow.

Swallows

The Swallows are native to every continent except Antarctica. They're adept at aerial feeding, which means they often are in mid-flight when they catch their food. The North American swallows migrate on longer journeys to warmer climates for the winter months.
Hummingbird

Hummingbird

Hummingbirds are solitary in nature and do not migrate in groups. They will often migrate to someplace a bit warmer in the south, like Florida, and will likely choose the same place again.
Canada geese

The Canada Goose

The Canada Goose is a native migratory bird to more arctic areas of North America. It has a regular migratory pattern, meaning, it doesn't fly all the way to South America during migration. These birds are now considered pests because they defecate all over parks and have very aggressive behavior. The aggressive behavior is there because humans feed the geese. I've told my kids to never do that.
Cranes in the wild.

Cranes

Cranes are beautiful birds and interesting migrators. Some migrate long distances for warmth and food, while some don't migrate at all. They are a threatened species.
Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle

Golden Eagles are also partially migratory. They can withstand cold climates, however, they cannot withstand a lack of food. If that happens, they must take flight.
A cute little Sandpiper

Sandpiper

Sandpipers are cute little birds that eat things out of the sand at beaches. They migrate to southern states and even to South America during the winter months, as they prefer warm weather.
Sign-up for Your Enthusiast News, Marketplace, Discussion, Posts, TV & More