The Doughnut Lassies in WW1
Foodie
The Doughnut Lassies in WW1

The history of National Doughnut Day is cooler than you might think.

National Doughnut Day is upon us. It's a beautiful day of appreciation for one of the "baked goods world" most precious commodities-- doughnuts. On this day, we celebrate the glory that is.
Did you know that while we take the doughnut for granted, that it only became widely popular because of some lovely women involved with the Salvation Army during WW1? The called themselves the "Lassies" and then later the "Doughnut Lassies". They followed close behind the  1st Ammunition Train, 1st Division in France during the
War, providing services like darning socks and mending the soldiers' uniforms. The soldiers asked for more so Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance figured out a way to 
fry doughnuts, either with a trash can or a helmet, to bring something sweet to the men fighting in the War. Before this, the fried food wasn't very well known and was loosely 
associated with the Dutch culture. After the "Doughnut Lassies" took charge on their mass inception, people started to catch on to the deliciousness. National Doughnut Day was decreed on the first Friday of June in Chicago 1939. It started as a fundraiser for the needy, which there were many at that time, as there are now. 
As you head out to places like Krispy Kreme, Dunkin' Doughnuts, & even Walmart for your free doughnuts today, take a moment to remember where it started. It'll make it that much better.
A Doughnut Girl in WW1.
A Doughnut Girl in WW1.
Soldiers scrambling for doughnuts.
Soldiers scrambling for doughnuts.
“...the fried food wasn't very well known...”
Doughnut Lassies in WW1.
Doughnut Lassies in WW1.
WW1 Doughnut Lassie
WW1 Doughnut Lassie
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